Library Archives

Stop Preparing. Start Doing. Today!

I think, sometimes the largest challenge that we have in the job search is that we spend so much time preparing ourselves so perfectly, that we miss opportunity when it presents itself. We attend employment workshops, we go to employment centres for advice, we learn LinkedIn, we complete assessments to determine what type of career we should be aiming for, we read up on networking, we learn what it takes to create the perfect resume, cover letter, and what types of jobs we should be applying for. Then we stop short of pulling it all together to apply for that perfect job. What is the point of having all of this knowledge if you’re not going to use it to help your search come to fruition?

We tell ourselves that we lack the right skill-set, experience, or expertise. We tell ourselves that we don’t have the time to apply. We make excuses to stop ourselves from achieving our dreams. What if, instead of arming ourselves with more knowledge about what we should be doing, we just did it? What if, we apply for that perfect job with our imperfect resume, cover letter and LinkedIn profile?

The reality is, the perfect cover letter or resume doesn’t exist. The perfect experience may, in fact, be not entirely what the organization is looking for – when presented with alternatives, many hiring managers do an about-face about what an ideal candidate looks like. We are each unique. We each bring something to the table. Sometimes, we feel that what we bring is not up to par with what is already there, not realizing that the hiring manager has never been exposed to this particular flavour of experiences. We compare ourselves to our imaginary counterparts so we can tell ourselves that others are better than us. We kill our own dreams.

I think if we force ourselves to sit down and just do it, we could do what it takes to find that perfect job. Make small changes as you go, but keep applying. Apply for the job you want, even if you’re not 100% qualified. Contact someone for an informational interview and learn more about your ideal position. Get in touch with the governing organization of your profession, if there is one – ask if there’s a way to get involved/get a membership/attend events catered to that career. Work on your LinkedIn profile. Ask people to review your resume and cover letter and offer feedback. Trying to everything is overwhelming – so much so that we don’t do anything.

So pick one thing you’ve learned recently and actually do it.

  • Define yourself – let your true self come out on paper
  • Narrow your focus – pick a range of jobs that you would really love to do
  • Contact your local library to see what resources they have that can assist you: The Vancouver Public Library Career Commons has a comprehensive list of materials to help you get started (but don’t get stuck there!). They also have a TON of workshops (don’t get stuck here either!).

When you’re done that one thing, do the next. Eventually, it becomes second nature to do it as you learn and grow and prosper into your dreams. Leave a comment to tell me what one thing you did after reading this post. I look forward to reading what has worked for you!

“You’re off to Great Places!
Today is your day!
Your mountain is waiting,
So… get on your way!”

-Dr. Seuss

Finding the first job

It’s easier to find a job when you have a job, or so the story goes. When you’re a newcomer to a new country it’s a bit more complicated. Most often, you’re not coming with a job in place.

You have to get a job:

One of the most difficult things for newcomers is getting that first job. You know what you were before you moved here: Engineer or Teacher, Doctor or Lawyer, Plumber or Carpenter and so on. You arrive and find that your qualifications need to be assessed and the process is long and complicated; or you find it difficult to have any response to your search for employment.. You hear: ‘you don’t have the Canadian Experience,’ ‘your qualifications don’t meet the BC professional requirements,’ or ‘you need to take one or two courses to have your credentials articulated as equivalent to BC standards’ (only to find that the one or two courses are near impossible to get). You find that you don’t know what you are anymore, or how you can make your old life fit with the new.

As your dreams of landing a job in your trained career wanes, it’s important to remember that sometimes, you need that first job to then get the job you want. The first job gives you a pay cheque. The first job counters the ‘Canadian experience’ argument as you begin to live Canadian workplace culture. The first job gives enough breathing room to let you figure out the rest.

My advice to newcomers on finding the first job:

Set your ideal target and set your bottom line:

  • Apply for the jobs that you want, and that you’re qualified for. Apply for the jobs you want, but think you’re not qualified for. The worst that will happen is…nothing. You won’t hear anything back from your prospective employer, or you may hear any of the above variations of why you’re not qualified. The best – you’ll get the job.
  • Apply for the jobs you don’t really want (your bottom line), but could do for short periods of time. Plan to accept a job you don’t necessarily want with a goal of continuing your search. Temporary employment provides breathing room to look for new employment, contacts in the community, and experience. It also looks better on a resume when applying for other positions – employers tend to prefer hiring those who are employed.

Talk to as many people as you can:

  • The folks at your BC Public Libraries are well equipped to refer you to the appropriate resources, whether it be employment assistance, translation of documents, language training, online resources and so on.
  • Contact the organization or governing body of the career field that you wish to work for. A simple Google search for Association of _______ (fill in the blank), BC will likely put you in touch with the governing body of your career. Call them. Ask them if to tell you what you need to know. Ask if you can volunteer in some capacity. The more you connect with others, the more you learn what you need to know to transition to your career in BC.
  • Look for a MeetUp group to connect yourself with others with common goals.
  • Connect with current employees and ask if they are willing to provide you with an informational interview. It may seem awkward, but most employees are willing to share insights into what their job entails. This also builds new connections.

Ask for feedback and practice:

  • Have others review your resume and cover letter to gain feedback. Make modifications if you feel a valid point has been demonstrated and you feel comfortable with the advice.
  • If you have been declined for a position, ask them to provide you feedback. A simple question such as ‘do you have any feedback on how I performed in the job interview?’ will let them know you’re motivated for possible future positions. Take notes of what is said and take time to reflect on how you can improve.
  • Research possible interview questions and have prepared answers for as many as you can. The process of thinking through an appropriate response will save you time and energy in the interview and will help you relax.

There are many more steps to securing employment; especially in a targeted career. The keys to securing the first job are to be open to alternatives, understand that this position is not permanent, and use the resources around you. Consider this practice for your move into your ideal career.

Massive Open Online Courses (MOOC)

Have you ever had an interest in taking a course at university, but didn’t want to pay the price required to enroll? Not only is there the cost of tuition, there’s the additional cost of the application fee, the required textbook and additional student fees. Post-secondary education offers a chance to improve your knowledge in a particular subject or work-related area, but it comes with a very high price tag. Wouldn’t it be nice to be able to try the course without the financial cost, to see if you liked it before embarking on the path to a post-secondary education? You can.

West Vancouver Memorial Library will be hosting an information session, to provide insight into a way that you can take university courses, through accredited and recognized universities, for minimal, or no, cost. MOOC – Massive Open Online Courses, are a recent development in distance education that allows access to online courses aimed at unlimited participation and open access via the web[1]. The courses are typically non-credit, but there are often options for receiving recognition for having taken them, and opportunities for receiving credit (which does come with a cost)[2].

MOOC_poster_mathplourde

MOOC courses have many things in common: video based lectures, interactivity through online quizzes, the ability to participate in online discussions, and frequent feedback so you can monitor your own progress. To find out if you’re interested in participating, it’s as simple as looking through the West Vancouver Memorial Library’s list of MOOC institutions and going from there. The library offers these tips to help you decide if a MOOC is right for you:

  • Watch the instructor’s introductory video
  • Check the course outline for prerequisites and the level at which the course will be taught
  • Look at the instructor’s college webpage and search the web for course reviews[3].

If you’re interested in finding out more, head to the West Vancouver Memorial Library on Tuesday, September 23, from 7:00 to 8:00 pm. Give yourself the gift of learning without the financial strings attached.

[1] Wikipedia
[2] West Vancouver Memorial Library
[3] West Vancouver Memorial Library