Library Archives

Vancouver Public Library Profile


The Vancouver Public Library has 22 branches that serve the city’s more than 600,000 residents.

Vancouverites come from a wealth of different countries and backgrounds and the city is known internationally for its inclusivity, which is made possible through programs and services designed to meet everyone’s needs.

The Vancouver Public Library is a main provider of many of these programs and services. For example, the library organizes Canadian Citizenship Preparation workshops. These sessions cover Canada’s history, symbols, geography, governing system, the rights and responsibilities of citizenship, in addition to other citizenship test topics.

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Stop Preparing. Start Doing. Today!

I think, sometimes the largest challenge that we have in the job search is that we spend so much time preparing ourselves so perfectly, that we miss opportunity when it presents itself. We attend employment workshops, we go to employment centres for advice, we learn LinkedIn, we complete assessments to determine what type of career we should be aiming for, we read up on networking, we learn what it takes to create the perfect resume, cover letter, and what types of jobs we should be applying for. Then we stop short of pulling it all together to apply for that perfect job. What is the point of having all of this knowledge if you’re not going to use it to help your search come to fruition?

We tell ourselves that we lack the right skill-set, experience, or expertise. We tell ourselves that we don’t have the time to apply. We make excuses to stop ourselves from achieving our dreams. What if, instead of arming ourselves with more knowledge about what we should be doing, we just did it? What if, we apply for that perfect job with our imperfect resume, cover letter and LinkedIn profile?

The reality is, the perfect cover letter or resume doesn’t exist. The perfect experience may, in fact, be not entirely what the organization is looking for – when presented with alternatives, many hiring managers do an about-face about what an ideal candidate looks like. We are each unique. We each bring something to the table. Sometimes, we feel that what we bring is not up to par with what is already there, not realizing that the hiring manager has never been exposed to this particular flavour of experiences. We compare ourselves to our imaginary counterparts so we can tell ourselves that others are better than us. We kill our own dreams.

I think if we force ourselves to sit down and just do it, we could do what it takes to find that perfect job. Make small changes as you go, but keep applying. Apply for the job you want, even if you’re not 100% qualified. Contact someone for an informational interview and learn more about your ideal position. Get in touch with the governing organization of your profession, if there is one – ask if there’s a way to get involved/get a membership/attend events catered to that career. Work on your LinkedIn profile. Ask people to review your resume and cover letter and offer feedback. Trying to everything is overwhelming – so much so that we don’t do anything.

So pick one thing you’ve learned recently and actually do it.

  • Define yourself – let your true self come out on paper
  • Narrow your focus – pick a range of jobs that you would really love to do
  • Contact your local library to see what resources they have that can assist you: The Vancouver Public Library Career Commons has a comprehensive list of materials to help you get started (but don’t get stuck there!). They also have a TON of workshops (don’t get stuck here either!).

When you’re done that one thing, do the next. Eventually, it becomes second nature to do it as you learn and grow and prosper into your dreams. Leave a comment to tell me what one thing you did after reading this post. I look forward to reading what has worked for you!

“You’re off to Great Places!
Today is your day!
Your mountain is waiting,
So… get on your way!”

-Dr. Seuss

NaNoWriMo (It’s National Novel Writing Month)


Have you ever wondered what it would be like to get the novel out of your head and put it down in writing? November is National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo): a challenge to write a novel of 50,000 words from November 1st to November 30th; a call to let go of your excuses and your fear and just write by the seat of your pants. If you’ve ever had a fleeting thought of writing a novel, now’s the time.

This program offers direction and encouragement to get you writing creatively and vibrantly through:

  • NaNo Prep – resources to help inspire us, challenge us, and prepare us to write a novel.
  • Pep talks from authors – Kami Garcia informs us that our excuses of being too busy are lame, our ideas don’t suck, our muse is not MIA and we ARE qualified to be writers.
  • Conversations with others – you can reach out to others in your region, join forums and discussions online
  • Earning badges – who doesn’t love a little external reward?

There are also programs for both youth and adults are being offered at various libraries throughout the Lower Mainland to help you get started. To list a few:

Burnaby Public Library: invites youth to submit the first chapter of their original novel to any BPL information desk or through email. The first chapter will be judged by BPL Librarians. One winner will be selected from each category: Younger Teens (grades 8 – 9) and Older Teens (grades 10 – 12). The winners will receive a $50 gift certificate to Metropolis Metrotown! The winning chapter will also be featured on the BPL Teens webpage.

Fraser Valley Regional Library (Maple Ridge): opening-up our Teen Area every Friday evening in November to provide space for like-minded writers to ply their trade together.

The New Westminster Public Library: offers a catalogued list of books written during NaNoWriMo.

Surrey Public Library: invites youth to join local author Denise Jaden and fellow teen writer Linda Xia for two hours of writing activities and discussion, Wednesday, November 5th from 4:00-6:00pm at the City Centre Library, Teen Lounge.

The Vancouver Public Library: will enter participants who complete this challenge in a draw where 3 winners will be chosen to have the first chapter (up to 5000 words) of their NaNoWriMo work read by an SFU Creative Writing consultant.

West Vancouver Memorial Library: invites you to come to the library and write like the wind!

Now if you’ll excuse me, it would appear that the prep section of the NaNoWriMo website is calling my attention. Will you join me?